CRISIS SUPPORT

Having a mental health crisis means different things to different people. 

If you feel like your mental health is at breaking point, you might experience painful or difficult to manage feelings, such as suicidal feelings, self-harm, panic attacks, flashbacks, hypomania or mania, paranoia or hearing unpleasant voices. You might also have other difficult experiences. 

If you need urgent help and support, it might help to tell someone you trust. They can be with you and help you decide what to do, such as contacting services on your behalf.

IF YOU NEED IMMEDIATE SUPPORT:

 

  • Go to your local A&E Department, where the psychiatric liaison team can help you for 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year. 

  • If you are with someone who has attempted suicide, call 999 and stay with them until the ambulance arrives.

IF YOU NEED LESS URGENT HELP:

  • Contact your GP during the daytime, or contact your local Out of Hours GP service.

  • Call 111 to speak to the free NHS helpline for anyone with an urgent healthcare need.

  • Call Samaritans. Samaritans can provide confidential support for people who are in crisis or feeling distressed or in despair. You do not have to feel suicidal to contact them. Phone: 116 123 (free 24-hour helpline). Website: www.samaritans.org.uk

  • The NHS Choices website includes help for suicidal thoughts and advice from the Samaritans, providing advice on starting a difficult conversation if you are worried about someone.

  • Face-to-face Support may also be available, depending on your location. If you live in Central London, The Listening Place offer face-to-face support for those who feel life is no longer worth living.

IF YOU'RE WITH A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH TEAM (CMHT):

  • During the day, contact your CMHT and ask for your care coordinator or duty worker.